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October 23, 2020

Physics Colloquium Series

Date: Thursday, October 29, 2020

Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm

Location: Zoom On-Line/Remote
Join Zoom Meeting
https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/7249079639
Meeting ID: 724 907 9639

Speaker: Philip Phillips, University of Illinois

Title: Does Noether’s Second Theorem Imply  Hidden Extra Dimensions in the Cuprates?

Abstract: For the past 30 years, the transport properties in the unusual metallic phase seen in the cuprate superconductors and many other quantum critical metals, have defied an explanation in terms of the standard building blocks of modern physics — particles with local interactions and conservation laws. A recent proposal suggests that all of the properties of such `strange metals’ can be understood if the current has an anomalous dimension not determined simply by dimensional analysis. My talk will focus on trying to understand this claim. To demystify this claim, I will first show that even in the standard formulation of electricity and magnetism, there is an extra degree of freedom, which has remained unnoticed until now, that can allow, in principle, for the current to have any allowable dimension.  This extra degree of freedom is a consequence of Noether’s Second Theorem.  However, I will show that the  only quantum theories to date which exhibit such odd behaviour are holographic models that are derived from a gravity theory that lives in higher dimensions. The existence of currents having anomalous dimensions, a direct probe of the existence of extra `hidden’ dimensions,  can be tested with the Aharonov-Bohm effect.  I will describe this effect and its potential impact for unlocking the secret of the strange metal in the cuprates.

Host: Dietrich Belitz

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October 16, 2020

Physics Colloquium Series

Date: Thursday, October 22, 2020

Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm

Location: Zoom On-Line/Remote
Join Zoom Meeting
https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/7249079639
Meeting ID: 724 907 9639

Speaker: Andrea Liu, University of Pennsylvania

Title: Exploiting the Malleability of Disorder to Design Biologically-Inspired Function

Abstract: The complexity of living systems poses a formidable challenge to physical scientists interested in biology. I will discuss one theoretical approach towards gaining possible insight into biological phenomena: to design systems to exhibit similar phenomena. To do so, we start with systems with complex energy/cost landscapes, which have far more variation in their properties than those with simple ones. This natural variation can be pushed even further by design, allowing us to tune in properties inspired by those common in living matter, such as the ability of proteins (e.g. hemoglobin) to change their conformations upon binding of an atom (oxygen) or molecule, or the ability of the brain’s vascular network to send enhanced blood flow and oxygen to specific areas of the brain associated with a given task. We create ensembles of systems designed for a given task to gain new insight into the relation between microscopic structure and function that may help us to understand living systems.

Host: Eric Corwin

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October 9, 2020

Physics Colloquium Series

Date: Thursday, October 15, 2020

Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm

Location: Zoom On-Line/Remote
Join Zoom Meeting
https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/7249079639
Meeting ID: 724 907 9639

Speaker: Marcelle Soares-Santos, University of Michigan

Title: Cosmology in the era of multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves

Abstract: Motivated by the exciting prospect of a new wealth of information arising from the first observations of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation from the same astrophysical phenomena, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) has established a search and discovery program for the optical transients associated with LIGO/Virgo events (DESGW). Using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), DESGW has contributed to the discovery of the optical transient associated with the neutron star merger GW170817, and produced the first cosmological measurements using gravitational wave events as standard sirens. After three successful observing campaigns, I present, in this talk, an overview of our results and their implications for the emerging field of multi-messenger cosmology with gravitational waves and optical data.

Host: Tien-Tien Yu

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October 5, 2020

Physics Colloquium Series

Date: Thursday, October 8, 2020

Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm

Location: Zoom On-Line/Remote
Join Zoom Meeting
https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/7249079639
Meeting ID: 724 907 9639

Speaker: Brian J. Smith, Department of Physics and Oregon Center for Optical, Molecular, and Quantum Science, University of Oregon

Title: Control and Measurement of Quantum Optical Pulses

Abstract:

The ability to manipulate and measure the spectral-temporal waveform of optical pulses has enabled a wide range of applications from ultrafast spectroscopy to high-speed communications. Extending these concepts to quantum light has the potential to enable breakthroughs in optical quantum science and technology. However, filtering, amplifying and optical nonlinear interactions often employed in classical pulse shaping and measurement techniques are incompatible with non-classical light. Controlling and efficiently measuring the pulsed mode structure of quantum light requires efficient means to achieve deterministic, unitary manipulation of pulses that preserves fragile quantum coherences. Here an approach to deterministically modify the pulse-mode structure of quantum states of light within an integrated optical platform is presented. The manipulation method is based upon application of both spectral and temporal phase modulation to the wave packet. With this approach we demonstrate deterministic spectral shift and time-lensing of single-photon wave packets through the application of linear and quadratically-varying temporal phase. Furthermore, application of quadratic spectral phase to a short single-photon pulse maps frequency onto time, which enables one to monitor the single-photon spectrum with a fast photon-counting spectrometer. We demonstrate experimentally the application of spectral shear within an interferometer followed by spectrally-resolved detection enables complete characterization of quantum light pulses. These techniques lay the ground for future quantum wavelength- and time-division multiplexing applications and facilitate interfacing of different physical platforms where quantum information can be stored and manipulated.

 

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August 20, 2020

Fall 2020 Physics Colloquium Series

Date: Thursday, October 1, 2020

Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm

Speaker: Richard Taylor, Department Head, UO Physics

Title: State of the Department

Location: Zoom On-Line/Remote
Join Zoom Meeting
https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/7249079639
Meeting ID: 724 907 9639

 

 

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June 22, 2020

COVID 19: Links to helpful resources

UO Campus and Physics Office space remains closed during COVID phase restrictions

In order to reduce the risk of exposure to students, staff, and faculty, and in response to the emergent COVID-19 situation, the Physics Department administrative office will be closed beginning March 17, 2020 for the coming weeks. Updates about university closures can be found here www.uoregon.edu/coronavirus

During this period, the office will provide service remotely. Email and phone messages will be checked regularly.

Refer to your March 20th ‘Package Deliveries’ e-mail for more information on FedEx, UPS, USPS delivery process.

Please use the following contact information for specific questions.

  • For University mental health support resources, please visit the Counseling Center website (https://counseling.uoregon.edu/crisis-support) or call the health center crisis hot line 541-346-3227
  • For undergraduate advising inquiries, please email Scott Fisher at rsf@uoregon.edu or call 541-346-4799
  • For graduate student-related inquiries, please email Dean Livelybrooks at dlivelyb@uoregon.edu or call 541-346-5855
  • For personnel-related inquiries, please email Anthony Fichera at afichera@uoregon.edu or call 541-346-4768
  • For accounting-related inquiries, please email physicsacctg@uoregon.edu
  • For payroll-related inquiries, please email physicspayroll@uoregon.edu
  • For Physics operations-related inquiries, please email Anthony Fichera at afichera@uoregon.edu or call 541-346-4768
  • For grant-related inquiries, please email physicsacctg@uoregon.edu
  • For budget-related inquiries, please email Anthony Fichera at afichera@uoregon.edu or call 541-346-4768
  • For purchasing and travel-related inquiries, please email Jani Scallion at scallion@uoregon.edu or call 541-346-5208

Thank you for your flexibility and understanding. Stay vigilant.

Richard Taylor                         Anthony Fichera
Department Head                    Business Manager

As a critical student service, the University Counseling Center will remain open during spring term for in-person appointments and drop-in therapy, while adhering to CDC health guidelines. Additional information is available on the counseling center webpage or by calling the support/crisis line 541-346-3227.

Academic modifications and support during COVID-19

Building Access: Request permission to enter UO campus:DOCUMENTING ACCESS TO BUILDINGS
Before coming to campus, including to retrieve materials from an office or work space, employees are expected to submit their plans into the appropriate smartsheet, accessible via the links below, to request and/or document their access.

COVID Updates

FAQs

Forms, Physics specific

Library Services for Remote Learning, For students

Phased Approach for Restarting Research Activity On Campus 

Physics Drop in Help Center support

Physics Undergraduate Student Resources

Physics Undergraduate Advising

Recent Faculty Research Publications

Remote Support

Student Advising

ZOOM Training resources

March 31, 2020

COVID 19: Links to helpful resources

  • Instructors continue to prepare for remote teaching for spring term, which begins on March 30. The Office of the Provost sent faculty and graduate employees information and guidance about connecting with students, livestreaming courses, accessibility, and other academic matters for the coming term. An academic continuity page continues to be updated with information for instructors.
  • As a critical student service, the University Counseling Center will remain open during spring term for in-person appointments and drop-in therapy, while adhering to CDC health guidelines. Additional information is available on the counseling center webpage or by calling the support/crisis line 541-346-3227.

Academic modifications and support during COVID-19

Building Access Request form

Building Access: Request permission to enter UO campus:DOCUMENTING ACCESS TO BUILDINGS
Before coming to campus, including to retrieve materials from an office or work space, employees are expected to submit their plans into the appropriate smartsheet, accessible via the links below, to request and/or document their access.

Commencement

COVID Updates

Faculty Services for Remote Teaching

FAQs

Forms, Physics specific

Library Services for Remote Learning, For students

On Campus Research Request Form

Phased Approach for Restarting Research Activity On Campus 

Physics Drop in Help Center support

Physics Undergraduate Student Resources

Physics Undergraduate Advising

Recent Faculty Research Publications

Remote Support

Student Advising

Quick Chat:  Quick reference page for COVID support updates

ZOOM Training resources

March 26, 2020

The university will hold a virtual town hall for students and their families

  • The university will hold a virtual town hall for students and their families to answer questions about remote education, student support, and how the UO is protecting campus and the community during the COVID-19 outbreak. The event will be livestreamed from 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 30 and can be viewed on this webpage. You may submit a question ahead of time anonymously using this web form.
March 13, 2020

Physics Colloquium

The Physics Colloquium series will resume in Spring term.

March 6, 2020

Physics Colloquium

Today’s Physics Colloquium will continue as scheduled.  (Updated 3/12/20 8:45am)

Date: Thursday, March 12, 2020

Speaker: Ben Farr, UO Physics

Title: The Latest Results from the LIGO-Virgo O3 Observing Run

Abstract: Having recently celebrated the fourth anniversary of the first detection of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger, the LIGO and Virgo detectors have collected an impressive census of compact binary mergers in the local universe. By the end of the second observing run in August 2017 the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration claimed a total of 10 binary black hole mergers and one binary neutron star merger. The third observing run began in April 2019, and during the first six months the collaborations alerted the astronomical community of 33 merger candidates. The preliminary classifications of these events include 21 binary black hole merger candidates, 4 neutron star black hole merger candidates, and 4 binary neutron star candidates. I will present some of what ground-based gravitational wave astronomy has taught us about compact binaries over the last four years, and what may lie ahead.

Host: Ray Frey

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