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March 20, 2019

Physics Faculty and GEs benefit from UO’s Science Teaching Journal Club

After evaluating articles and research about teaching science and studying broader teaching methods participants are enabled to explore and support implementation of evidence-based teaching practices.

Several graduate students who have been involved in the Science Literacy Program continue to attend the journal club throughout their doctoral studies at the UO because of the valuable teaching experience it provides on top of training in their area of research.

The journal club meets every Thursday during the academic term at 9 a.m. in Room 217 in the Lewis Integrated Science Building. University faculty members and students interested in learning more about STEM teaching practices are welcome to attend.

For more information, including reading schedule and a full bibliography of the journal club’s readings, visit the Science Literacy Program website.

You can read the full Around-the-O article here.

February 6, 2019

Stanley Micklavzina Named an Honorary Doctor in Science at Lund University in Sweden

The physics demonstration room is Stanley Micklavzina’s domain.

It is here where the magic comes together. Lasers, magnets, hoses, wires, glassware and many, many other unidentifiable science-y looking gadgets fill tables and floor-to-ceiling shelves.

Micklavzina puts these items together in different configurations so he and his colleagues in the physics department can best explain how the laws of physics work.

It just so happens that Micklavzina has a knack for making even the most complicated scientific concepts understandable, and that ability has earned him what is to-date the highest honor he’s ever received.

Thanks to a chance email Micklavzina sent roughly 17 years ago, Lund University in Sweden will be awarding Micklavzina an honorary doctorate.

“I like to tell the joke that I got the call from Sweden,” Micklavzina said. “Of course, any physicist wants the call from Sweden because that means they won the Nobel Prize. Well, I got the call from Sweden, and for me, this is like getting the Nobel Prize. For what I do, it’s that big of an honor.”

You can read the full Around-the-O Article here.

& You can read more here.

January 22, 2019

Tristan Ursell and Nick Lowery’s Research on Competing Species Highlighted on Phys.Org

When species compete for limited resources, structures in their environment can be the difference between coexistence or one eliminating another. Relationships between species also are important, according to new research by University of Oregon scientists.

Scientists have suspected a deep relationship between biodiversity and physical structure of the environment, but nailing it down has been elusive.

The UO’s Tristan Ursell and Nick Lowery have revealed part of that relationship by crunching mathematically rich formulas in thousands of supercomputer simulations across multiple scenarios. In the research, they focused on the influences of physical structures, such as packed particles in soil and epithelial cells in the mammalian gut, on the survival of species living in those environments.

Their findings are in a paper focusing on the dynamics and stability of ecological communities in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

You can read more here,

Stanley Micklavzina Named an Honorary Doctor in Science at Lund University in Sweden

The physics demonstration room is Stanley Micklavzina’s domain.

It is here where the magic comes together. Lasers, magnets, hoses, wires, glassware and many, many other unidentifiable science-y looking gadgets fill tables and floor-to-ceiling shelves.

Micklavzina puts these items together in different configurations so he and his colleagues in the physics department can best explain how the laws of physics work.

It just so happens that Micklavzina has a knack for making even the most complicated scientific concepts understandable, and that ability has earned him what is to-date the highest honor he’s ever received.

Thanks to a chance email Micklavzina sent roughly 17 years ago, Lund University in Sweden will be awarding Micklavzina an honorary doctorate.

“I like to tell the joke that I got the call from Sweden,” Micklavzina said. “Of course, any physicist wants the call from Sweden because that means they won the Nobel Prize. Well, I got the call from Sweden, and for me, this is like getting the Nobel Prize. For what I do, it’s that big of an honor.”

You can read the full Around-the-O Article here.

& You can read more here.

November 28, 2018

Bernd Crasemann, UO Physics Emeriti professor, passed away at the age of 96

Bernd Crasemann passed away on the morning of Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018, at the age of 96.

Born on Jan. 23, 1922, in Hamburg, Germany, Bernd received his early education in Chile before moving to the United States, where he obtained a bachelor’s degree from the UCLA in 1948, followed by a Ph.D. from the UC Berkeley in 1953.

He then joined the physics faculty at the University of Oregon, where, apart from several visiting appointments throughout his career, he stayed until his retirement

You may find more information here, and here.

October 24, 2018

Kara Zappitelli Recipient of the 2018 Karfilis Women in Leadership Award

Congratulations to Physics GE Kara Zappitelli on receiving the 2018 Karfilis Women in Leadership Award.   This award is the highest honor given out by the UOWGS. The award recognizes graduate students at the University of Oregon who have demonstrated strong dedication to the mission of the professional development of women in all disciplines of science to enable them to become successful contributors to their fields through exemplary leadership.

Kara Zappitelli is a fourth year Ph.D. candidate in physics in the Alemán Lab. She studies the complex interface between neurons and conductive substrates in order to improve retinal implant technology. In addition to her research, she is actively involved in multiple efforts to improve retention and representation of underrepresented groups in physics and STEM as a whole. She has been the graduate student coordinator of the North Star Project since its inception in 2016, co-founded the UO Women in Physics group, and formerly served as the President of the physics graduate student body. She is truly honored to accept the prestigious Karfilis Women in Leadership Award and will continue her efforts towards fostering a more equitable and inclusive climate in STEM.

September 26, 2018

McMorran and Yasin Featured in WIRED Article

When it comes to magnifying the miniscule, electrons are fundamentally better than visible light. That’s because electrons, which have wavelike properties due to quantum mechanics, have wavelengths a thousand times shorter. Shorter wavelengths produce higher resolution, much like finer thread can create more intricate embroidery. “Electron microscopes are pretty much the only game in town if you want to look at things on the atomic scale,” says physicist Ben McMorran of the University of Oregon.

You can read the full article HERE.

July 5, 2018

Michael Raymer featured in an Around-the-O article

A call to action by a UO professor has helped catalyze bipartisan legislation recently introduced in Washington, D.C.

Physics professor Michael Raymer and University of Maryland physicist Christopher Monroe authored proposals for a National Quantum Initiative that is the basis for federal legislation introduced this week. The National Quantum Initiative Act will establish a comprehensive national program to accelerate research and technology development in this emerging area.

Its goals are to advance the country’s economy and national security by securing the United States’ position as the global leader in quantum information science.

You can read the full article here.

June 14, 2018

John Toner Recipient of Martin Gutzwiller Fellowship

UO physics professor John Toner is on a roll. He’s won a research fellowship that will take him to Germany in the 2019-20 academic year, and a paper he published two decades ago has landed in a journal’s 25th anniversary collection.

Toner will spend up to seven months in residence at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, Germany, as a result of his selection as the 2018 Martin Gutzwiller Fellow.

You can read the full ‘Around the O’ article here.

June 7, 2018

Steve Kevan Named Next Director of Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source

Congratulations to UO Physics professor Steven Kevan on his new position of director of Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source.

After an international search, Stephen D. “Steve” Kevan has been named the new director of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Kevan takes on the role of ALS director at a pivotal point in its history. The facility, which will celebrate its 25th anniversary later this year, is taking its first steps toward a major upgrade, dubbed “ALS-U.”

You can read the full article here.

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